We Study the Microbiome.

We encourage collaboration with health professionals and non professionals interested in learning more about bacteria, fermentation, nutrition and the (HMI) human microbiome industry.

We are professionals, CEO, Health coaches, Functional medicine doctors, Mom’s and Dad’s Etc…

Meet our amazing Microbiome Community

Sandi Miller

At Rock the Biome we craft ancient traditional fermented foods & beverages infused with modern flavor

Suzanne Warburton

Studied Diploma Information, Communications and Technology (DipICT Level 5) at Manukau Institute of Technology. Lives in Auckland, New Zealand

Sabine Solika

A spiritual rebel on a path to heal the world.🙏🏻😎

Jenny Pandol

COO and Co-Owner at Microbiome Learning Center LLC.
Health Coach and Fermentationist

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We are still learning daily as to how important our gut flora / microbiome is to our health.

A healthy gut

In fact, metagenomic research indicates it’s often the collection of functions microbes provide that’s important for health, rather than the presence or absence of a particular microbe. For example, a healthy gut contains bacteria that produce vitamins.

Microbes won’t just cure disease in the future — they’re curing disease right now.

The microbiome work that I spend the most time on right now is the built environment. One of the reasons that I am highly motivated to think about the built-environment microbiome is because we spend 90% of our lives indoors. Due to the great amount of time that we spend indoors, there’s a very likely possibility that the built environment is an important source for microbes for the human body. And I’m highly motivated by the possibility that one day we’ll be able to engineer and design buildings and urban spaces in a way that will promote human health and productivity.

-Jessica Green

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Well, in the human microbiome field, the traditional view of microbes is that we were basically at war with them

you know, we have to put a lot of vigilance standing up to bad microbes with antibiotics, with hygiene practices, and so on. And it was also more or less assumed that everyone had the same microbes in the gut, on the skin, and so forth.

We now know from human studies and from animal studies that the beneficial microbes are playing a tremendous role. For example, what particular collection of beneficial microbes you have in the gut has a large effect on how efficiently you can extract calories from different kinds of food, how likely you are to be able to escape colon cancer or heart disease — even how you metabolize different kinds of drugs.

The beneficial microbes in the guts of mice greatly alter their susceptibility to different kinds of infectious disease. So, having the right microbes to begin with can ward off the harmful pathogens you might come in contact with.

One of the things we need to do is just characterize what’s out there — to look at everything from people living very traditional lifestyles to people living in modern cities, and the interplay between humans and environment. I think there’s tremendous potential for restoring some of the connection to the environment we’ve lost through living in hermetically sealed buildings and relying extensively on air conditioning. Perhaps one solution is to have buildings that a little more open.

-Rob Knight

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Learn From

Experts in the field

“I might add that with almost any field that you’re in, you can study the microbiome if there are microbes associated with that system.”

Jessica Green

“you might not want to spend $100,000 figuring out what the microbes in your gut look like, but you’d probably pay $100 to do that. Those drops in costs make a lot of these different types of things more feasible.”

Rob Knight

“What would your life be like if you learned that you are more powerful than you have ever been taught?”

Bruce Lipton, PHD

Stem cell biologist

“Glyphosate binds to and inhibits the action of an enzyme known as EPSP synthase, which plants need in order to make three important aromatic amino acids: phenylalanine, tyrosine, and tryptophan”

Stephanie Seneff

Senior Research Scientist , MIT Computer Science and Artificial Intelligence Laboratory

Ready to improve your health?

All of you study the microbiome, obviously, but you’re focused on different aspects. What’s your favorite microbiome, and why does your research tend to gravitate to that area?